Taking Stock After the Storm – Comstock's magazine

0
5
taking-stock-after-the-storm-–-comstock's-magazine
Taking Stock After the Storm – Comstock's magazine

A historic Capitol Mansions house was devastated by the storm. (Photos and captions by Nick Shockey)

Photos: Atmospheric rivers damage homes and businesses across Sacramento

Back Web Only Jan 23, 2023 By Nick Shockey

Waterlogged fields and roads. Split trees and shoulders piled with branches. Shredded shingles strewn across the sidewalks like confetti. In Sacramento, these are a few of the lasting reminders of the storms that roiled the region over the past three weeks. As 2023 began, Northern California found itself in the pathway of a series of atmospheric rivers, fast-moving ribbons of water vapor infused with moisture from the tropics. According to the FOX Forecast Center, these plumes have dropped 32 trillion gallons of water on California since Dec. 24. 

While the storms have abated for now, the property damage they caused will remain far after the sun returns. Preliminary estimates from Sacramento County’s Office of Emergency Services suggest that the storms caused over $123 million worth of damage in the county alone. Other experts estimate that the total bill may be $1 billion or more across California.

Photographer Nick Shockey documented some of the damage around Sacramento, including to homes and businesses in the city’s Capitol Mansions, Land Park, East Sacramento and Colonial Heights neighborhoods. How did your home or business fare in the storms? Please share your stories in the comments below. 

— Jennifer Fergesen

A historic Capitol Mansions house was devastated by the storm.

Service trucks park in Land Park as tree clearing crews prepare to clean up after the storm.

A downed tree blocks the street at the corner of H Street and Carlson Drive in Sacramento.

An East Sacramento residence lays tarped after heavy rains and winds.

Two uprooted trees collapsed on adjacent homes in the Capitol Mansions district.

A collapsed tree crushes a parked car on J Street in Midtown.

Crews prepare to clear an uprooted tree on 36th and H streets.

A snapped telephone pole blocks the street at the corner of 23rd and L.

A fallen tree in Crocker Park near downtown.

A root ball is all that remains in the front yard of an East Sacramento house.

The devastation to this Colonial Heights home was a common scene after the onslaught of the recent storms.

Stay up to date on business in the Capital Region: Subscribe to the Comstock’s newsletter today.

Infrastructure — roads, bridges and dams — is the backbone of any economy.  Business can’t function without it. The Association of Civil Engineers estimates that nationally, defective or failing infrastructure will cost the average family $3,400 a year over the next decade.

The Folsom Lake College Visual and Performing Arts Center by LPAS.    (Photo courtesy of LPAS)

Architects and engineers find ways to build around a rough market

The design-build industry has been absolutely battered by the spoiled economy. Architecture and design firms lament layoffs, nonexistent financing and an utter lack of optimism for 2010. Yet a number of large regional projects are keeping local firms afloat and offering a silver, albeit temporary, lining.