Christmas tree recycling underway for coastal restoration

0
11
Christmas tree recycling underway for coastal restoration

It’s that sad time of year again … time to cut the Christmas tree down and throw it away! But why be sad when your tree can be put to good use? Many communities are participating in a tree recycling program that actually uses the trees to restore the coastline. Trees are being picked up and sent to bayou in New Orleans this week. brought Sauvage. There they are used as breakwaters. “They help limit erosion and create habitat for fish,” says James Karst of the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana. Limiting coastal erosion is an important step in protecting against hurricanes. According to Karst, restoration is “vital to the future of New Orleans” as the wetlands help limit the strength of a hurricane and storm surge. Not all municipalities participate in tree recycling. Those who collect for coastal restoration are listed below. To participate in recycling, all trees must be real, unflocked, and unpainted, with their stands, ornaments, lights, and tinsel removed. They must not be in a bag when placed on the curb.Orleans Parish: Residents receiving solid waste disposal services in Service Areas 1 and 2 of Richard’s Disposal and Metro Service Group should clear their trees by 5:00 a.m. park at the curb on their regular pick-up day this week. Residents receiving Empire Service pickup (those in the French Quarter or DDD) should park their trees by the curb by 4 a.m. on Thursday the 13th. The trees are used to create the marsh habitat in Bayou Sauvage.St. Tammany: Trees can be brought to St. Tammany Parish Fairgrounds (1515 North Florida Street in Covington) or the Old Levee Board Property (61134 Military Road in Slidell) during the day until January 28th Community: Turtle Cove Environmental Research Station in Southeastern is collaborating the City of Hammond, the City of Ponchatoula, the Middendorf Restaurant and the Southeastern Sustainability Center. Hammond City and Ponchatoula City – From 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. through March 1st, trees can be dropped off at the Hammond Maintenance Facility (18104 Hwy. 190, next to Piggly Wiggly Super Market). Southeastern Louisiana University – From Trees can be returned to the Southeastern Sustainability Center (2101 North Oak Street) by the end of the month. Monday to Thursday, handover from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Middendorf’s Restaurant in Manchac – you can hand in your tree at any time until the end of the month. However, if you’d like to enter to win a $ 50 gift certificate, you’ll need to drop off your tree during regular business hours (Wed-Sun, 10:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.) and go to the hostess’s booth to take part in the raffle to participate. The trees are used to restore the Manchac wetlands, St. Charles Parish: From now until January 21st, roadside pickups and drop-offs in the East and West Bank Bridge Parks are available. The trees are used for the restoration of the coast. St. John the Baptist: Roadside pick-up is on Thursdays in January. Jefferson Parish: The pick-up from Jefferson Parish took place last week. The trees are used to reduce coastal erosion and restore the natural hydrology of the Barataria Basin through the construction of wave dampening fences and the filling in of artificial channels. In Mississippi, there are recycle drop off points in Harrison County. Pass Christian Harbor (the western parking lot on Highway 90), Long Beach Harbor parking lot by the Pavilion on Highway 90. Ken Combs Pier (parking lot on Courthouse Road Pier), Highway 90 in Gulfport, The Bobby Eleuterius Sports Complex (Behind D’Iberville Elementary.)) on Brodie DriveThe Rodenberg Avenue parking lot on Highway 90 in BiloxiThe Woolmarket Work Center on Highway 67 and Old Woolmarket Road

It’s that sad time of year again … time to cut the Christmas tree down and throw it away! But why be sad when your tree can be put to good use?

Many communities participate in a tree recycling program where the trees are actually used to restore coastlines.

Trees are being picked up in New Orleans this week and brought to Bayou Sauvage. There they are used as breakwaters.

“They help limit erosion and create habitat for fish,” says James Karst of the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana.

Limiting coastal erosion is an important step in protecting against hurricanes. According to Karst, restoration is “vital to the future of New Orleans” as the wetlands help limit the strength of a hurricane and storm surge.

Not all municipalities participate in tree recycling. Those who collect for coastal restoration are listed below. To participate in recycling, all trees must be real, unflocked, and unpainted, with their stands, ornaments, lights, and tinsel removed. They must not be in a bag when they are placed on the curb.

Orléans parish: Residents who receive a solid waste collection service in Service Areas 1 and 2 of Richard’s Disposal and Metro Service Group should park their trees on the curb before 5 a.m. on their regular collection day this week. Residents picking up through Empire Service (those in the French Quarter, or DDD) should park their trees by the curb by 4 a.m. on Thursday the 13th.

The trees are being used to restore the swampy habitat in Bayou Sauvage.

St. Tammany: Through January 28, trees can be brought to St. Tammany Parish Fairgrounds (1515 North Florida Street in Covington) or the Old Levee Board Property (61134 Military Road in Slidell) during the day.

The trees are used for swamp rehabilitation.

Tangipahoa community: Southeastern’s Turtle Cove environmental research station works with the City of Hammond, the City of Ponchatoula, Middendorf Restaurant and Southeastern’s Sustainability Center.

  • Hammond City and Ponchatoula City – From 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. through March 1, trees can be dropped off at the Hammond Maintenance Facility (18104 Hwy. 190, next to the Piggly Wiggly Super Market).
  • Southeastern Louisiana University – Trees can be handed in at the Southeastern Sustainability Center (2101 North Oak Street) from now until the end of the month. The handover is possible Monday to Thursday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. On Fridays, the handover is possible from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
  • Middendorf’s Restaurant in Manchac – you can hand in your tree at any time until the end of the month. However, if you’d like to enter to win a $ 50 gift certificate, you’ll need to drop off your tree during regular business hours (Wed-Sun, 10:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.) and go to the hostess’s booth to take part in the raffle to participate.

The trees are used to restore the Manchac wetlands.

Parish of St. Karl: Roadside pick-ups and drop-offs in the East and West Bank Bridge Parks are available until January 21st.

The trees are used for coastal restoration.

John the Baptist: Roadside pick-up is on Thursdays in January.

Jefferson Parish: The pick up at Jefferson Parish took place last week. The trees are used to reduce coastal erosion and restore the natural hydrology of the Barataria Basin through the construction of wave dampening fences and the backfilling of artificial canals.

In Mississippi, there are recycle-return facilities in Harrison County.

  • Pass Christian Harbor (the western parking lot on Highway 90)
  • Long Beach Harbor parking lot by the Pavilion on Highway 90.
  • Ken Combs Pier (parking lot at Courthouse Road Pier), Highway 90 in Gulfport
  • The Bobby Eleuterius Sports Complex (behind D’Iberville Elementary) on Brodie Drive
  • The parking lot on Rodenberg Avenue on Highway 90 in Biloxi
  • The Woolmarket Work Center on Highway 67 and Old Woolmarket Road